Real Food

Momma Darlin’s Elderberry Syrup + Some Non-DIY Alternatives

 

Even with healthy eating, exercise and daily sunshine, sometimes the immune system could still use a boost. Elderberry syrup is one of those immune boosters to always have in the medicine cabinet, (well, actually the fridge πŸ˜‰ ) especially as the seasons change. I just made a fresh batch for the kiddos over the weekend.

What is elderberry syrup?

Elderberries are small berries that contain many vitamins and minerals that help with preventing illness or shortening the duration of the illness.Β I get my elderberries from a local health food store, but they can also be purchased onΒ Amazon. I buy them dehydrated so they can be bought in bulk and stored for a while. To make the syrup, the elderberries need to be re-hydrated so all of the juice can be extracted. The ‘syrup’ part of the name comes from the addition of raw honey. It is preferable to source local, unfiltered wildflower honey. This kind of honey has trace amounts of pollen from local flowers and has been known to help with allergies.

So basically, elderberry juice is mixed with honey to make elderberry syrup. I also like to add a few extras to the mix. Ginger, cinnamon, clove and vitamin C powder are my go-to’s. The 3 spices can be fresh or dried and ground. Sometimes I just use one of the spices and sometimes I use all three. It just depends on what I have on hand. I always include the vitamin C though!

Suggested usage for elderberry syrup

The dosage for elderberry syrup is anywhere from 1/2 to 1 full teaspoon for kids and 1/2 to 1 full tablespoon for adults as a preventive measure which can be taken daily. Despite our best efforts, sometimes illness still strikes. In this case, I give the same dosage amount, but much more often. Usually every 3 hours or so.

I have been told by a worker at the health food store that elderberry syrup falls under the ‘homeopathic medicine’ category and therefore should not be taken within 10 minutes of eating or drinking. I don’t exactly follow this advice. Here lately, I’ve been adding the elderberry syrup to my boys berry/yogurt breakfast bowls to sweeten them instead of adding plain honey. I suppose they get a little more elderberry syrup than suggested, but we haven’t had any ill-effects thus far. Also, they LOVE it!

For this recipe you will need

  • 3 cups filtered water
  • 2/3 cup dried organic elderberries
  • 1 tbsp fresh ginger OR 1 tsp dry ginger
  • 1 tsp cinnamon powder
  • 1 tsp dried clove
  • 2 tbsp vitamin C powder (I get mine here)
  • 1 cup raw local honey (local is preferred, but be sure it’s raw! That part is important!!)

Instructions

  • Add water, elderberries, and optional spices (ginger, cinnamon and clove) to a small pot and heat on the stove.

  • Boil for 30 to 45 minutes until the liquid reduces by about half.
  • Using an immersion blender, blend the berries mixture together. Alternatively, mashing with the back of a spoon would also work.
Elderberry seeds are not meant to be consumed. If you don’t have a VERY fine mesh strainer to keep the tiny pieces of seeds out of the final product, don’t use the immersion blender. Instead, just squeeze all of the juice out of the berries with the back of the spoon.
  • Strain and discard the solid pieces of berries.

  • Let the liquid cool to room temperature.
I usually end up with roughly 1 cup after straining. Sometimes more, sometimes less.
  • Once cooled, stir in vitamin c powder and raw honey.
I like to use Vitamin C powder that is extracted from real foods as opposed to synthetic vitamin C. This form is easier to use by the body as it is harvested from wild-crafted berries. The one I use is calledΒ Pure Synergy Pure Raidiance.
  • Store in a glass container in the refrigerator.

5 from 3 votes
Print

Momma Darlin's Elderberry Syrup

Given daily, this syrup can help prevent illnesses through the immune boosting properties of elderberries and raw honey. This syrup can also be used to help the body heal should sickness ever strike.

Keyword Homeopathic medicine, Immune boosting, Natural health
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 45 minutes
Total Time 50 minutes
Author MommaDarlin

Ingredients

  • 3 cups filtered water
  • 2/3 cup dried organic elderberries
  • 2 tbsp vitamin C powder
  • 1 cup raw local honey

Optional Spices

  • 1 tsp dried ginger or 1 tbsp fresh ginger
  • 1 tsp cinnamon powder
  • 1 tsp dried clove

Instructions

  1. Bring water, elderberries, and optional spices of choice (ginger, cinnamon and clove) to boil in a small pot

  2. Boil uncovered until the liquid reduces by about half. This usually takes 30 to 45 minutes

  3. Using an immersion blender, blend the berries and water together. Alternatively, mashing with the back of a spoon would also work
  4. Strain and discard the solid pieces of berries through a fine mesh strainer

  5. Let the liquid cool to room temperature
  6. Once cooled, stir in vitamin c powder and honey
  7. Store in a glass container in the refrigerator

Recipe Notes

Give this dose daily for prevention, or every 3 to 4 hours when fighting a cold/flu.Β 1/2 to 1 tsp for kids and 1/2 to 1 tbsp for adults.Β 

Β 

Not into making your own Elderberry Syrup? Try these instead!

These are great if you aren’t interested in DIY medicinal projects OR if you’re on vacation and forgot to pack your elderberry syrup! Yup, it happens πŸ˜‰

Sambucol Elderberry Syrup

Sambucol Elderberry GummiesΒ (I actually have a recipe for these too! Coming soon πŸ™‚ )

Sambucol Elderberry Tablets

Here is a sugar free way to enjoy the healing properties of the Elderberry plant.Β Traditional Medicinals Herbal Tea With Echinacea Plus Elderberry

 

Do you have another form of elderberry that your family enjoys? Let me know in the comments below!!

8 thoughts on “Momma Darlin’s Elderberry Syrup + Some Non-DIY Alternatives

    1. Thank you for your question, LouEsta! To be honest, I’m not sure! It doesn’t usually last us more than a couple weeks, but I’ve used it about a month after making it and it still tasted fine. The honey works as a preservative which I assume extends the shelf life. My educated guess is that it lasts about 6 months in the refrigerator. I would just do a quick sniff test and use your best judgment here. This recipe can also be frozen if you’re concerned about it keeping long enough in the refrigerator.
      Anybody else have any input?


      1. We love it! This is the second time making it. The 2 year old woke up with a cold today. I think I should make enough to use it for prevention this time around πŸ™‚

        1. Aww, praying your little one feels better soon! And yes, I always have some of this stuff in my fridge during the colder months. If we all get sick, I’ll make a double batch πŸ˜‰

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *